Basic Badminton Skills Should Learn

In Asia, badminton is a game where families (especially fathers) bring their kids to badminton courts on weekends. Dad will teach their kids the very basic skills in badminton. Since young, kids would have picked up the basic techniques. When they grow up, they’ll find their group of friends to play badminton. With a solid badminton background, these kids explore further skills in badminton and start to develop new advanced techniques. Badminton is not only a national sport to some Asian countries; it is also an inherited culture where families and friends maintain relationships.

My point here is, you will only need to learn basic badminton skills at the beginning. Once you have mastered these basics, you won’t need to learn advanced techniques. You will naturally develop them! Executing strong smashes, performing quality deceptions, or diving to defend a smash… You’ll find badminton exciting when you are able to perform these techniques! Learn the correct basics in badminton and practise them. When you possess strong basic skills, you will eventually develop advanced techniques by yourself.

The most important basic badminton skills you should learn are:

Gripping technique: The correct way of gripping a badminton racquet enables you to transfer more power into your badminton strokes.

Basic badminton stroke (full arm swing): When you have mastered the basic badminton swing motion, you will be able to use it to perform a badminton clear, drop shot, and smash.

Footwork: Badminton is a game of speed. Effective and organised footwork plays an important role in enabling you to move faster around the badminton court. It’s simple! Just learn, practise, and master these 3 basics and you will find yourself exploring new advanced techniques by yourself.

A few examples of advanced badminton techniques are: Fast attacks (maximum wrist action). Attacking clear. Net kill. Deception.

However, I recommend you master the basics first before trying these new skills. Badminton basics are the most important techniques in the game and the key to master the game is to master the basics first. Pick these skills up and you’ll be well on your way to better game performance!

Cure a Golf Hook

  • Weaken your Grip – You could be playing with a grip that is too strong. You’ll want to simply rotate both hands around the grip and towards the target. This will make it much harder for the clubface to naturally close through the impact zone. Don’t over do it, and like everything else, testing is crucial. Make sure to test this, before moving on, unless you are positive that you already play with a weak grip.
  • Move the ball forward in your stance – It is common of players that slice the ball to play the ball forward in their stance. So copy them. If you hook, the result should be a relatively straight ball. (Side Note: Whether you hook or slice, your first goal should be to learn to do the opposite.) Moving the ball forward in your stance should get some things back on track.
  • Aim to the left (to the right if left handed) of the target – Start out with an open stance to the target. This will put that clockwise rotation on the ball that you are looking for. Just open your stance a little bit, and swing along the line of your shoulders.
  • Make sure that you are finishing with your weight on your forward foot – This is the single best solution for the hook. If you hook the ball, chances are that you finish with some of your weight still on your back foot. This causes you to come around the ball with a closed clubface. This is the number one cause of the deadly snap-hook. Finish with all of your weight forward, and you’ll never experience it.

One Handed Back Hand Drive

Unfortunately, the basic breakdown for beginners starts before the ball even arrives. Club players can be notoriously slow for getting positioned to hitting the ball. Now, I realize that club players arrive at the scene with frailties of all descriptions. However; it is critical to get the body aligned with the racquet back and knees flexed with the ball arriving between knee and waist height over the front foot. At this point, you have just dramatically increased your probability for success. The grip will need some experimentation but generally speaking a continental grip (hand shaking) plus a 1/8th clockwise turn (right-hander) will work nicely. Yes, this is not the heavy grip rotation that you may be using on the forehand side. Most of the top players in the world now use the western grip on the forehand but good luck trying to go this far over on the backhand.

The next most common mistake among beginners is a tendency to drop the racquet head below the wrist upon initiating from the back swing. All chances for success are now lost because the wrist gets ahead of the head and the order of events has failed. It is helpful to bring the racquet back with the other hand to maintain the stability of the racquet before delivering the forward momentum. This other hand can also moderate the slight flexion in the wrist during the backs swing. Take a look at some old footage of Bjorn Borg. He had a kind of a hitch in his back swing. Basically, he had a two handed backs wing and a beautiful one handed delivery. Next, the front shoulder will drop and align with the front knee. Naturally, the elbow will be tucked. Your legs, shoulder, forearm, and wrist will uncoil rhythmically delivering a square racquet head to the ball. Your head will stay down through the stroke and your racquet will finish high rolling through the ball. Whoosh!

Maximize Stay and Play Golf Experience

Players of all ages and abilities are most effective when they practice, practice, practice. Many stay and play golf facilities have driving ranges. There are some that have indoor simulators. Hitting balls is a great way to hone your skills, enhance balance control, and burn calories. You can also ask the staff about lessons or how you can practice with their pros.

Is your equipment up to par? Do you need new gloves? Take your clubs to the pro shop and have the staff repair them. This is where you can solve the last minute hiccups that occur.

Rest and Hydration

Get at least 8 hours of sleep prior to your outing. It will improve your focus and performance. Be sure to drink plenty of water before tee time. Playing 18 holes in the sun can lead to dehydration if you do not drink enough fluids.

Warm Up

Before you begin playing, do some stretching exercises. Take a few minutes to extend your arms and legs. Making a few swings is another way to warm up. Hit a few balls and gauge how the wind is blowing.

Walking vs. Riding

If you walk the entire 18 holes, it is equivalent to a 5 mile walk or almost a 4 mile run. Using a cart is a helpful way to get around the greens if necessary, but walking the course can burn up to 2,000 calories.

Eating Healthy

Most stay and play golf courses offer healthy snacks to their patrons. Consider packing some fruits and vegetables to have on hand while you play. Granola bars and nuts will help you refuel and keep your mind sharp.

Keep Moving

A player can exceed 10,000 steps in a typical round. That is the recommended guideline for daily exercise. Stretching in between shots can burn more calories. If you are waiting for your turn, you can walk around and practice your swings.

The biggest plus of a stay and play golf facility is the short distance from the greens to your room. After a full day, you can relax with your peers and get ready to repeat it the next day.

Choosing Right Golf Balls

Maybe using the same type golf balls as the PGA golf pros will improve your game…and maybe it won’t. You need to choose the golf ball that’s right for your own game. Choosing the wrong kind of golf ball can be a bigger handicap to your game than starting at the 19th hole. Choosing the right kind of golf ball can have you feeling like a Tiger, even if you don’t quite have his handicap.

Golf balls come in three styles: 2-piece, 3-piece, and high performance. 2-piece golf balls are designed for improving your distance, while 3-piece and high performance golf balls can typically help with accuracy.

The 2-piece golf balls are especially good if you’re just starting out or if you’ve played just enough to know you really want to give this sport a try. They’re also terrific for high handicap golfers who have been around a while. Hey, we can’t all be pros! These are the most common type on the market and usually less expensive than 3-piece balls. Best of all, the large rubber core provides faster speed off the tee for those of you with a slow swing. In turn, that gives you greater distance.

It could happen that the first time you played, everyone was astounded at the way you slammed that little white ball with the power of a major league batter aiming for a grand slam. But that’s doubtful. Distance is usually developed over time as you develop your swing and find the groove. When you are just beginning, chances are you need to improve your accuracy more than your distance. Once you’ve developed your accuracy, then is the time to choose a golf ball and clubs that will help improve your distance.

If you haven’t developed consistent accuracy – that is, having the ball consistently land in the same “general” area each time – then the 3-piece golf ball probably isn’t right for you. It’s just not as forgiving of miss-hits as the 2-piece golf ball. The same goes for high performance balls. They’re pretty much designed for advanced golfers…and their price bears this out!

One factor to always be considered is cost. Simple, standard 2-piece golf balls usually come in 18-packs and are relatively inexpensive. The cost of golf balls may seem small in comparison to the overall cost of pursuing the sport but the inexperienced golfer can go through a lot of golf balls in a very short space of time!

The key, as with most golf equipment, is to choose the right kind of golf ball for your level of play. Consider your swing and your game, and then choose the ball that will help eliminate your weaknesses and build upon your strengths.

If you don’t choose the right golf ball for your level of play, your golf round might just become what Mark Twain once called it: “…a pleasant walk, spoiled”.

Different Types of Tennis Balls

Pressurized vs. Pressureless Tennis Balls:

  • There are two main types of tennis balls: pressurized and pressureless.
  • Pressurized tennis balls have a hollow core, filled with air. Some tennis ball manufacturers use nitrogen in the center, because this air tends to last longer – pressurized balls will lose their pressure after about a month or so after opening the pressurized can that they come in. As they lose their pressure, they become “dead” and do not bounce so well.
  • Pressureless balls have a solid core. These tennis balls are great for anyone who does not play tennis that often and/or to use and training tennis balls. These tennis balls do not lose their bounce. However, the felt will slowly wear off, and they will eventually need to be replaced.

Regular Duty, Extra Duty, or High Altitude Tennis Balls:

  • When you buy tennis balls, the container that they come in should be clearly marked with what kind of balls it contains – regular duty, extra duty, or high altitude tennis balls.
  • Regular duty tennis balls should be used on indoor and clay courts. Extra duty balls would get too fuzzy if used on clay courts.
  • Extra duty tennis balls are used on grass courts and tennis courts.
  • High altitude tennis balls are used in places like Denver where you are playing 4,000 feet or more above sea level. These balls have different pressure – regular balls would bounce too much at this elevation.

Tennis Ball “Fuzziness:”

  • Without the yellow (or white…) fuzziness of tennis balls, the game of tennis would be a whole lot different. The fuzz of the tennis balls creates friction. The fuzziness of the balls creates dray in the air, making topspin and backspin more pronounced and more possible.

Numbers on the Tennis Balls:

  • Have you ever wondered what the numbers on your tennis balls meant? Do they reference the weight or style of the tennis balls, etc.? No.
  • The numbers on the tennis balls are simply for your benefit – if you are playing with Wilson 1 balls, and the people on the court next to you are playing with Wilson 2 balls, it is easier to retrieve your tennis balls when they wander onto another tennis court. The numbers help you tell your balls apart from other players’ balls (assuming that you are not using the same brand and same number of tennis balls!)

Golf Specific Weight Training

Why should there be any reason for fear when 80 year old persons are comfortably going through them. And what’s more is these elderly persons have quite often hailed the weight training as being responsible for the dramatic improvement in their game as well as the easing of nagging pains that usually do not respond to medication like back pains.

Junior golfers are also enthusiastically embracing golf specific weight training with similar results. Some of these kids are barely in their teens. But what has been even more amazing is the impact that the golf specific weight training has had on their golf game. Many have been able to increase the distance of their drives by yards that are in the higher levels of a double digit figure.

Still this has not prevented golf specific weight training from being greatly feared amongst many golfers who have various excuses not to touch exercise.

There are those who claim that weight training will give them bulging muscles and make them stiff when it is common knowledge that flexibility is very important in golf.

For these golfers, the mere mention of dumb bells sends shivers down their spines as they picture themselves struggling with heavy weights in some gym somewhere.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Golf specific weight training really involves strength training and not body building. As a result it involves the use of lifting lighter weights more repetitively.

The sort of light weights that teenagers and senior citizens alike do not have any problem handling.

Whether you dread it or not, the facts are that golf specific weight training is extremely important for any golfer.

Preventing Summer Swimming Accidents

If you’re planning on beating the heat with a dip in the pool this summer, you should make sure to follow a few simple safety steps:

  • When you go swimming, swim near a lifeguard if one is available. If you are swimming in an area that doesn’t have one, make sure you never go swimming alone.
  • Seek out any warning signs that might be posted where you’re swimming, and make sure you obey them. While rules may seem irritating and even unnecessary at times, they are there for your own safety and the safety of those around you.
  • If you have any children with you, make sure you keep a close eye on them. Don’t let them wander out of your sight. Even if there are lifeguards around, your child is ultimately first and foremost your responsibility.
  • While it can be relaxing to kick back with a few beers, swimming while intoxicated is a terrible idea. You put yourself and everyone around you at risk. Drink responsibly, and wait a fair amount of time before going into the water.
  • If you’re at a swimming pool, don’t run. You’ve been told this since you were three, but it’s still true. When smooth cement gets wet, it can get very slippery, which can result in you slipping and falling.
  • Learn CPR. It isn’t hard to be certified, and it can save lives. It is the responsible, adult decision to make.

Even if you follow all the safety rules and conduct yourself responsibly and respectfully, you can still be injured while swimming. If you are injured as the result of someone else’s irresponsibility, you deserve compensation. You may want to consider engaging the services of a personal injury attorney.

Cornerstone to A Consistent Golf Swing

Consistently solid contact is a by-product of accurately re-creating the three key positions outlined in the previous article. These basic elements are the foundation for analyzing any swing in slow motion. Everything you else you hear or read about proper swing mechanics are by-products of the three key positions.

Let’s dig a little deeper. Is there anything we can do before the swing begins to increase the odds of achieving the three positions automatically?

What is the basic element (ie. cause) underlying every swing? A golfer’s balance at address. Based on my experience, the majority of once-a-week golfers assume they are perfectly balanced at address, but fight to maintain it once the swing begins.

Can you predict a golfer’s skill level by examining their posture at address? Any golfer, even a novice, can sense a player’s proficiency by observing their body shape at address. If we can agree that posture affects balance, then poor posture is the ultimate cause underlying every recurring swing fault.

Here is a guideline for mastering perfect posture: you want to stand as close to your natural height as possible.

How often do you see a golfer on the practice range “hunched” over the ball at address? Perhaps this is an unconscious habit developed over years of being told to “keep your head down!”

Is there a simple technique that guarantees perfect posture (and balance) every time? Of course. Every tour player uses a modified version of this technique. As you develop a feel for the technique, the three elements (ie. positions) mentioned above will quickly become second nature.

What is the secret to perfect balance?

The key is feeling the weight of the club – from the moment you take it out of the bag until the end of the follow-through. If you can’t feel the clubhead before the swing begins, then the odds of maintaining perfect balance at impact are slim indeed.

There are two guidelines for creating perfect balance at address.

Number one: stand tall and allow the clubhead to extend your arms naturally so the clubhead hovers above the ground. Number two: bend the knees enough to just kiss the ground with the clubhead.

Watch closely and you will see how tour players barely ground the club behind the ball (or if they do, the club is raised slightly before the swing begins).

Focus on feeling the weight of the clubhead and get ready to hit the ball farther with less effort.

Ideal Badminton Set For You

If you are playing badminton for fun, you can easily purchase a badminton set from either a supermarket or a large sports store. In some places, you can find badminton set sold in a hardware store or even a pharmacy. There are certain sets which are nicely packed together in a carrying case with a zip. These usually consist of everything you need in a badminton set and do not cost much but they are basically quite useless and can easily hurt your wrist. It is best to get medium cost rackets. You may need to purchase several packs of shuttlecocks as the feathers can easily be damaged or perhaps you can use the plastic types which are more durable. Lastly, a badminton bag would be helpful and handy to carry your badminton set around.

As for purchasing a badminton set for competitions or tournaments, it is advisable to obtain advice from badminton centers or refer to the sports specialist as to which set is appropriate. You can also consider purchasing the equipments online using search engine. The rackets used for competitions are usually of a higher quality than those used for fun and therefore the cost is heftier. You will need a minimum of at least two rackets just in case if the strings were to snap in the racket which you are using.

As for the shuttles, you will require at least two packs of the feathered ones. Get the high quality types of shuttlecocks which are packed separately. There are also synthetic nylon plastic types that can withstand the forceful hitting and last longer but ensure that the heads are made of cork and not plastic. Where the net is concerned, it is usually provided by the badminton courts, both indoor and outdoor. If you need to purchase a net, then look for nets with metallic poles. Also check for an all-weather net that can withstand both sun and rain if you intend to play on an outdoor court.